13 Classic Stories We Can’t Stop Adapting Into Movies


Bride of Frankenstein (3/10) Movie CLIP – Teaching the Monster Manners (1935) HD

Not as much of a thirst trap as Dracula, but there’s still a sexy version.

Bride of Frankenstein (1935): Though it’s a sequel to the original James Whale film, it includes elements of the novel that didn’t make it into the earlier movie (as well as an intro that brings Mary Shelley to life). So I’d say it counts. Darkly hilarious in moments and deeply poignant in others, it’s a top American film in any genre. Streaming on Tubi.

Young Frankenstein (1974): You can really feel Mel Brooks’ affection for the source material (the movies, at least) in his funniest, but also most cinematically beautiful, satire. Streaming on HBO Max.

Flesh for Frankenstein (1973): Filmed in Italy by American director Paul Morrissey and released as Andy Warhol’s Frankenstein in the U.S., this mid-70s take suggest’s Baron von Frankenstein’s (Udo Kier) experiments were motivated by horniness. Streaming on AMC+ and Shudder.

Frankenstein (1931): James Whale’s sequel might top it (just slightly), but this version made Frankenstein, and Boris Karloff, stars. It’s not particularly faithful (none of the adaptations are, really), but it’s what we think of when we think of the monster. Streaming on Tubi.

The Curse of Frankenstein (1957): Just as Hammer’s Dracula would do a year later, its take on Frankenstein teams Peter Cushing and Christopher Lee for a bloody spectacle. Available for digital rental.

The Spirit of the Beehive (1973): A beautiful, Guillermo del Toro-esque dark fantasy that begins with a child’s fascination with the movie Frankenstein and evolves into a story that parallels that of the film. Streaming on The Criterion Channel.

Frankenstein (2015): Though set in modern Los Angeles, this version’s emphasis on the monster’s point of view places it, oddly enough, a bit more in line with Shelley’s vision than many other adaptations. It isn’t very good though. Streaming on Peacock, Shudder, The Roku Channel, Vudu, Tubi, and Freevee.



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