Explained: Why was India’s consignment of Wheat rejected by Turkey? What is Rubella disease? – Times of India


In a recent report, Turkey has rejected an Indian wheat consignment over phytosanitary concerns, initiating the ships to sail back on May 29, 2022. The MV Ince Akdeniz loaded with 56,877 tonnes of durum wheat is now returning back to Kandala port in Gujarat from Turkey, according to an update by S&P Global Community Insights.

The move has prompted a great deal of concern among Indian traders.

Turkish authorities have stated that the wheat consignment from India was detected with Indian Rubella disease and was therefore denied permission by the Turkish Ministry of agriculture and forestry.

So far, India’s commerce and agriculture ministries have not commented on the situation. However, officials believe the presence of Indian Rubella plant disease may cause serious concern for any importing nation, although this is a rare instance in terms of Indian wheat.


What is Rubella disease? How is Turkey’s allegations likely to affect India

Rubella disease or German measles is a contagious viral infection caused by the rubella virus. It is most often characterized by its distinctive red rash and can lead to mild to no symptoms in patients. An infection from a Rubella virus can last upto 3-5 days and can spread when an infected person coughs or sneezes or through nasal and throat discharge.

Having said that, during a time, when the whole world including India is battling an ongoing pandemic, the allegations of Rubella disease in Indian wheat can be concerning. Following the rejection of the Indian wheat shipment by Turkish authorities over Rubella disease concerns, the demand for Indian wheat may be affected internationally. This could trigger the prices of wheat to reduce in the country and abroad.

What are the symptoms of Rubella disease?

Symptoms of Rubella disease are mostly mild in adults and children alike. While adults usually experience a low-grade fever, sore throat, and a rash that starts on the face and spreads to the rest of the body, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), a red rash is typically the first sign of the infection in children. Other symptoms include:

– Headache
– Mild pink eye (redness or swelling of the white of the eye)
– General discomfort
– Swollen and enlarged lymph nodes
– Cough
– Runny nose

As per the US health agency, about 25 to 50% of people infected with rubella will not experience any symptoms.

When should you contact a doctor

Although Rubella is a mild infection and people often experience mild to no symptoms, there are certain complications that may arise with it.

According to Mayo Clinic, some women who get infected with rubella experience arthritis in the fingers, wrists and knees, which generally lasts for about one month. In some rare cases, rubella can cause an ear infection or inflammation of the brain, says the health body.

Additionally, if a pregnant woman is infected with rubella, it may affect the baby severely and can be fatal in some cases.

How to prevent a Rubella infection

In order to prevent the Rubella disease, you can get a rubella vaccine, which is usually administered as a combined measles-mumps-rubella vaccine also known as the MMR vaccine.

Children are recommended to receive the shot between 12 and 15 months of age, and again between 4 and 6 years of age.

The MMR vaccine is said to protect people against the rubella disease for life, as per Mayo Clinic.

FAQs

  1. What is Rubella disease?
    Rubella is an infectious but mild illness caused by the rubella virus. It can spread when an infected person coughs or sneezes or through nasal and throat discharge.
  2. What are the symptoms of Rubella disease?
    Symptoms of rubella infection include low grade fever, rashes, headache, mild pink eye, general discomfort, enlarged lymph nodes and red rashes.
  3. Are there vaccines for Rubella disease?
    Rubella disease can be prevented with the rubella vaccine, usually administered as a combined measles-mumps-rubella vaccine also known as the MMR vaccine.



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